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Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Oct 04, 2011 Tracking factory slaves across Asia

QUOTE: We traveled to Cambodia planning to tell the story of an escape from modern-day slave labor but what we found were tales of more women trapped in debt-bondage in Malaysia. In Cambodia, we found the women who had escaped, but we also learned about dozens of other workers stuck in similar circumstances, unable to get home unless they paid off their "debt" to a recruitment agency.

CNN (Cable News Network)
Apr 12, 2011 A Campaign Against Girls in India

QUOTE: The abortion of female fetuses has increased as medical technology has made it easier to detect the sex of an unborn child. If it is a girl, families often pressure the pregnant woman to abort... Another form of violence against women — dowry deaths — is equally well-documented, and just as ugly.

New York Times
Apr 03, 2011 China Takes Dissident Artist Into Custody

QUOTE: Rights advocates say the detentions are an ominous sign that the Communist Party’s six-week crackdown on rights lawyers, bloggers and dissidents is spreading to the upper reaches of Chinese society… “It’s an attempt to redefine the limits of what kind of criticism is tolerable,” he said. “The government is moving the goalposts and a lot of people are finding themselves targeted.”

New York Times
Mar 30, 2011 In Crackdown by Chinese, a New Arrest

QUOTE: The recent wave of disappearances and detentions began when a Chinese-language Web site hosted in the United States posted a call in late February for frustrated Chinese to take to the streets in a so-called Jasmine Revolution to protest corruption and unjust rule. The Chinese government… has apparently ordered that any signs of dissent be nipped in the bud.

New York Times
Mar 30, 2011 Philippines Says China Executes Three Filipinos

QUOTE: “This is a sad day for this country and we are afraid for the other Filipinos who are also on death row who have been neglected by the government,” Garry Martinez, chairman of Migrante International... More than 200 Filipinos are being held in Chinese prisons, 72 of them on death row for drug trafficking. Amnesty International... said China executed more people in 2010 than any other country.

New York Times
Mar 17, 2011 With U.S. Nuclear Plants Under Scrutiny, Too, a Report Raises Safety Concerns

QUOTE: Mr. Lyman suggested that the commission was being hypocritical: the official evacuation zone surrounding nuclear power plants in the United States is only 10 miles, although critics have long urged that it be increased. The agency “should not be using different standards for Americans abroad than it does at home,” Mr. Lyman said.

New York Times
Mar 15, 2011 Uzbekistan Expels Human Rights Watch’s Staff

QUOTE: Human Rights Watch announced on Tuesday that the government of Uzbekistan had decided to expel its employees from the country, a move the group said indicated a “deepening human rights crisis” in the authoritarian former Soviet republic.

New York Times
Mar 14, 2011 For Elderly, Echoes of World War II Horrors

QUOTE: “I couldn’t believe it,” Mr. Saga said. “They were even shoving old people out of the way. The old people couldn’t save themselves..." “I saw the ugly side of people, and then I saw the good side,” he said. “Some people only thought of themselves. Others stopped to help.”

New York Times
Mar 11, 2011 Human Rights Advocates Vanish as China Intensifies Crackdown

QUOTE: Mr. Teng is one of many prominent rights defenders and advocates who have disappeared and are being detained, some with no legal authority, in what critics say is one of the harshest crackdowns in many years. The detainees’ relatives and supporters say previous periods of confinement did not last this long and in such total silence.

New York Times
Aug 01, 2010 In Koreas, Floods Carry Land Mines

QUOTE: Dozens of North Korean land mines loosened by heavy rains have washed ashore on South Korean riverbanks and beaches near the border, presenting a lethal new threat to residents already wary of surprises and nefarious motives from the North.

New York Times
Jul 27, 2010 China Pushes to End Public Shaming

QUOTE: The Chinese government has called for an end to the public shaming of criminal suspects, a time-honored cudgel of Chinese law enforcement but one that has increasingly rattled the public.

New York Times
Jul 22, 2010 A Grim Chapter in History Kept Closed

QUOTE: The government has conceded that Mao committed “errors,” but his reputation in China is still officially sacred. Wary of challenges to the man whose body lies on display in Tiananmen Square, publishers of writings about the era submit to a three-tier censorship process: at the government’s General Administration of Press and Publication, the Party History Research Office and the Party Literature Research Office, according to Ding Dong, a historian.

New York Times
Jul 21, 2010 U.S. to Impose More Sanctions Against North Korea

QUOTE: “These measures [further economic sanctions] are not directed at the people of North Korea, who have suffered for too long due to the misguided and maligned priorities of their government,” Mrs. Clinton said at a news conference, flanked by Mr. Gates and South Korea’s defense and foreign ministers. “They are directed at the destabilizing, illicit, and provocative policies pursued by that government.”

New York Times
Jul 20, 2010 Bulldozers Meet Historic Chinese Neighborhood

QUOTE: More recently, those who reside in the neighborhood known as Gulou are anxiously counting the days until construction crews begin turning its 32 charmingly decrepit acres into a polished tourist attraction called Beijing Time Cultural City.

New York Times
Jul 20, 2010 Japan Training Program Is Said to Exploit Workers

QUOTE: They [Chinese women] were subjected to 16-hour workdays assembling cellphones at below the minimum wage, with little training of any sort, all under the auspices of a government-approved “foreign trainee” program that critics call industrial Japan’s dirty secret.

New York Times
Jul 27, 2009 Big Tobacco's New Targets

QUOTE: In Africa the battle for the hearts, minds and lungs of new smokers is being waged particularly aggressively.

Time Magazine
Jul 16, 2008 Court Convicts Former Samsung Chief

QUOTE: The former chairman of the Samsung Group, Lee Kun-hee, was convicted of tax evasion charges on Wednesday but was spared prison after the court suspended his three-year sentence. Mr. Lee was also fined $109 million. But the Seoul Central District Court cleared him of criminal charges of breach of trust, which stemmed from two Samsung affiliates’ decisions to sell stock to his son, Jae Yong, at unfairly low prices to help the son take over management control of the business empire.

New York Times
Jul 14, 2008 South Korea Recalls Envoy to Japan

QUOTE: South Korea announced on Monday that it was recalling its ambassador to Tokyo to protest Japan’s renewed claim to a string of islets that have been the focus of a protracted territorial dispute.

New York Times
Jul 12, 2008 North Korea Blames South in Shooting

QUOTE: North Korea blamed South Korea on Saturday for the death of a South Korean tourist, who was shot by a North Korean soldier before dawn on Friday morning after wandering into a restricted military area. North Korea also refused to let South Korean officials enter its territory to investigate the shooting. The incident, in which a 53-year-old woman was killed after apparently wandering into a restricted military zone near the North’s Kumgang resort, added chill to already-frosty relations between the two Koreas.

New York Times
Jul 11, 2008 China Deports British Citizen

QUOTE: Dechen Pemba, 30, who had lived in Beijing since September 2006 studying Mandarin and teaching English, held a work visa valid until November 2008. But on Tuesday morning, seven or eight police officers confronted her as she left her apartment. They forced her back inside, told her to pack a bag and, after searching its contents, escorted her to the airport.

Washington Post
Jul 11, 2008 Voice Seeking Answers for Parents About a School Collapse Is Silenced

QUOTE: A week later, plainclothes officers intercepted Mr. Huang on the street outside his home and stuffed him into a car. The police have informed his wife and mother that they are holding him on suspicion of illegally possessing state secrets. “They’ve been using this method for a long time,” said Zhang Jianping, a contributor to the Web site who has known Mr. Huang since 2005. Nobody knows the grounds for his arrest, but many people have the same idea. Mr. Zhang said, “It may be because the schools collapsed, and so many children died.”

New York Times
Jul 11, 2008 Court Cases and Demonstrations Put a New Government to the Test in Thailand

QUOTE: Just five months after a military junta handed back power through a parliamentary election, Thailand’s latest try at democracy is being severely tested by street demonstrations and a barrage of court cases. On Thursday, the foreign minister, Noppadon Pattama, was forced to resign after nationalist furor over a centuries-old dispute with Cambodia regarding the ownership of a 900-year-old Hindu temple on the countries’ border.

New York Times
Jul 11, 2008 Olympic Sponsors to Benefit Under a Tougher Stance in China (Advertising)

QUOTE: The restrictions are meant to clamp down on so-called ambush marketers, which are companies that are not official sponsors but hope to gain some halo effect from the Games. One advertiser that is likely to suffer the most is Nike, which has broad marketing ambitions in China but no qualifying sponsorship deal. Ambush marketing has long been a flashpoint at the Olympics. Sponsors pay upward of $65 million for the right to affiliate their brand with the Olympics, and they do not want their advertisements eclipsed by nonpaying competitors. The job of policing the marketing landscape is generally left to the host country, the International Olympic Committee and national organizing committees.

New York Times
Jul 01, 2008 China Blocks U.S. Legislators’ Meeting

QUOTE: Two United States representatives who were in Beijing to lobby for the release of more than 700 political prisoners had hoped to have dinner on Sunday with a group of Chinese human rights lawyers. But security agents had a different idea: they detained some of the lawyers and warned the others to stay away.

New York Times
Jun 30, 2008 Hundreds March in India for Gay Rights

QUOTE: Waving rainbow flags and chanting "Gay India does exist," nearly 1,000 gay activists and their supporters marched in coordinated parades in three Indian cities Sunday, demonstrating their growing confidence and hope for change on a subcontinent where homosexuality is illegal.

Washington Post
Jun 30, 2008 Proud in New Delhi: India's uneasy relationship with gay pride.

QUOTE: The parades have become a regular part of the landscape in places such New York City, but in India's conservative society, participants in the parade and their audience are still getting accustomed to the celebration. Not everyone involved in the New Delhi march felt entirely comfortable bearing their faces to a frenzy of media cameras and busloads of police officers. Wearing a rainbow-colored paper mask, Ajay (he didn't want to give his last name), 26, said his gay friends in Delhi are quite open online, but that the situation on the streets is different. "We cannot hold hands in public or show affection," he said.

Newsweek
Jun 29, 2008 Anger Over Rape-Murder Case Sparks Riot in China

QUOTE: Thousands of people thronged a police station in southwestern China to protest the alleged coverup of a teenage girl's rape and murder, witnesses and officials reported Sunday. The crowd set fire to a government complex and several police vehicles.

Washington Post
Jun 27, 2008 U.S. to Delist North Korea As Sponsor Of Terrorism

QUOTE: President Bush moved Thursday to drop North Korea from a list of countries that sponsor terrorism and to lift some trading sanctions, after the isolated totalitarian state turned over a long-delayed report that includes details of plutonium production in its nuclear program.

Washington Post
Jun 26, 2008 Activists Warned on Olympic Protests

QUOTE: The warning against dissent in Shanghai appears to be part of a broader national effort to avert protest by Chinese, particularly those known as petitioners, meaning those who seek the redress of grievances that run the gamut from land and environmental problems to corruption and political matters. One Shanghai petitioner said that he and others were detained on June 18 after a memorial service for an activist who died shortly after release from prison last year.

New York Times
Jun 26, 2008 The Starting Line: China Denies I.O.C. Criticism After Official’s Tibet Remarks (Rings)

QUOTE: The incident in question occurred Saturday during the controversial Lhasa leg of the Olympic torch relay, when Zhang Qinglin, the Communist Party leader of Tibet, said: “Tibet’s sky will never change and the red flag with five stars will forever flutter high above it. We will certainly be able to totally smash the splittist schemes of the Dalai Lama clique.”

New York Times
Jun 26, 2008 Farmer-Turned-Activist Plants Seeds of Reform (Innovators)

QUOTE: His main weapon was Chinese law, the letter of which offers many guarantees that, in practice, are often set aside by party leaders. In a country where the Communist Party crushes any attempt at forming associations outside its control, Lu's goal of spreading the word on how to use law books to oppose local leaders amounted to a relatively novel political challenge.

Washington Post
Jun 24, 2008 China’s Visa Policy Threatens Olympics Tourism

QUOTE: Chinese authorities acknowledged putting new visa restrictions in place in May — after foreign embassies reported fewer visas being granted and tighter, sometimes seemingly arbitrary, restrictions. The government did not release guidelines detailing the changes in policy; it often does not. But a foreign ministry spokesman, Qin Gang, said in May that they would be temporary...Many hotels in Beijing are struggling to find guests; some large travel agencies have temporarily closed branches; and people scheduled to travel here for seminars and conferences are canceling. The number of foreign tourists visiting Beijing fell sharply in May, dropping by 14 percent, according to the city’s statistics bureau.

New York Times
Jun 21, 2008 In China’s Medal Factory, Winners Cannot Quit

QUOTE: Many Chinese sports schools, in which more than 250,000 children are enrolled, focus on training at the expense of education. Critics, like the former Olympic diving coach Yu Fen, are calling for changes. They say athletes are unprepared to leave the sports system that has raised them. “I do not want to work as an athlete, but as an athlete here I have no freedom to choose my future,” Yang said, speaking through the team’s official interpreter. “As a child, I didn’t learn anything but sport, and now what do I do? I can’t do anything else. I have my own dreams, but it is very difficult. I don’t have the foundation to make them come true.”

New York Times
Jun 21, 2008 Frustrated Burmese Organize Aid Forays: Ad Hoc Groups Formed In Cyclone's Aftermath, But Causes May Widen

QUOTE: Defying roadblocks and bureaucratic obstruction, volunteers have reached devastated villages in many parts of the Irrawaddy Delta, dropping off food, drinking water and other essentials and bringing back photos that contradict claims in the state media that life is returning to normal.

Washington Post
Jun 19, 2008 S. Korea's Lee Offers New Beef Apology

QUOTE: South Korean President Lee Myung-bak apologized again on Thursday for failing to grasp the militant mad cow fears of his people and promised them that any U.S. beef sold here would only be from younger cattle deemed to be less at risk of the disease.

Washington Post
Jun 11, 2008 Protests in South Korea Imperil Government

QUOTE: President Lee Myung-bak confronted the biggest challenge to his young and increasingly unpopular administration Tuesday as tens of thousands of demonstrators filled central Seoul to protest his agreement to resume suspended imports of American beef and to denounce a broad range of other government policies.

New York Times
Jun 11, 2008 Standing Up for Workers’ Rights in Japan

QUOTE: Slowly and reluctantly, Japan’s salarymen are learning to stand up for their rights, and in the process rewriting the social contract that had once bound workers to companies with near feudal bonds of loyalty.

New York Times
Jun 06, 2008 Chinese Parents Organize, Seeking Justice: Many Ignore Pressure From Government to Move On After Quake

QUOTE: Undaunted by new pressure from the Chinese government, grieving parents are beginning to mount organized efforts to seek redress for the collapse of schools during last month's earthquake.

Washington Post
Jun 04, 2008 Thailand faces revived protests

QUOTE: For more than a week, thousands of Thais have flocked to a protest camp on a downtown royal avenue where many of the nation's past political dramas played out, sometimes violently. The same organizers who led the 2006 campaign have vowed to stay on the streets until they bring down Prime Minister Samak Sundaravej, who took office in February after democratic elections that ended 16 months of military rule. They also want to see former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra, whom the military ousted, put on trial for corruption.

Christian Science Monitor
Jun 03, 2008 Myanmar Rulers Still Impeding Access

QUOTE: One month after a powerful cyclone struck Myanmar and 10 days after the ruling junta’s leader promised full access to the hardest-hit areas, relief agencies said Monday that they were still having difficulty reaching hundreds of thousands of survivors in urgent need of assistance.

New York Times
Jun 02, 2008 Gates Accuses Myanmar of ‘Criminal Neglect’

QUOTE: In the strongest remarks yet by a high-ranking American official, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said on Sunday that Myanmar was guilty of “criminal neglect” for blocking large-scale international aid to cyclone victims, and that more Burmese civilians would perish unless the military regime reversed its policy.

New York Times
May 31, 2008 In Disclosure, North Korea Contradicts U.S. Intelligence on Its Plutonium Program

QUOTE: An 18,000-page declaration submitted by North Korea to the United States is stirring debate about whether American intelligence agencies previously overstated how much plutonium the Pyongyang government might have produced for its nuclear weapons program.

New York Times
May 30, 2008 School Collapse Furor Gives Rise to Contrition: Official in China Withdraws From Olympic Relay After Admitting Lax Oversight on Construction

QUOTE: Lin Qiang, vice inspector of the province's educational department, said the buildings might have been able to better withstand the quake's force "if we educational officials hadn't left loopholes for corruption," the government-run New China News Agency reported Thursday. Lin said he had to "reject the honor" of carrying the torch.

Washington Post
May 28, 2008 U.S. Navy Waiting for Junta's Permission to Deliver Burma Aid

QUOTE: Adm. Timothy J. Keating, who heads the U.S. Pacific Command, told reporters at the Pentagon that sailors and Marines aboard the USS Essex and three other Navy ships in the Bay of Bengal are "desperate to provide help" but are growing increasingly frustrated by the Burmese junta's refusal to accept aid from U.S. and other foreign naval vessels.

Washington Post
May 27, 2008 Progress for Aid Workers in Myanmar

QUOTE: While opening its door to international donors, the military government has refused permission to United States, French and British warships loaded with supplies just outside its territorial waters. In denying entry, the government has said it fears that any such aid from Western powers would have “strings attached.” However, it has allowed more than 60 United States Air Force flights to bring supplies to the Yangon airport.

New York Times
May 27, 2008 U.S. Resumes Human Rights Dialogue With China

QUOTE: Many observers have said the human rights situation here, particularly the issue of free speech by dissidents, has declined markedly in recent months as part of a security tightening in the lead up to the Beijing Games in August. In addition, the Chinese government has come under heavy criticism abroad for its crackdown in Tibet following the eruption of anti-Chinese rioting in March.

Washington Post
May 27, 2008 Burma Extends House Arrest of Nobel Prize Winner

QUOTE: The government's decision to confine her to her dilapidated lakeside bungalow for another year was widely predicted. It was conveyed to her by officials during a 10-minute visit to her home. Earlier, 30 of her supporters tried to march from the NLD headquarters to her home, but their protest was quickly broken up, with about 16 people arrested.

Washington Post
May 26, 2008 Myanmar’s Survivors Still Waiting for Food

QUOTE: The government, which insists that the emergency phase of the disaster is over, showed a video suggesting the country had enough rice, and that what it needed instead was billions of dollars for long-term reconstruction. Some analysts fear that the focus on rebuilding is a ploy.

New York Times
May 25, 2008 Grief in the Rubble: Chinese Are Left to Ask Why Schools Crumbled

QUOTE: “This is not a natural disaster,” said Ren Yongchang, whose 9-year-old son died inside the destroyed school. His hands were covered in plaster dust as he stood beside the rubble, shouting and weeping as he grabbed the exposed steel rebar of a broken concrete column. “This is not good steel. It doesn’t meet standards. They stole our children.”

New York Times
May 24, 2008 China’s Rush to Dispose of Dead Compounds Agony

QUOTE: President Hu Jintao and Prime Minister Wen Jiabao have urged rescue workers to save lives “at any cost.” But the scale of the disaster has forced the government to dispose of the dead with little ceremony, closing the door on any opportunity family members have of identifying their kin by sight and upsetting the traditional Chinese reverence for the deceased.

New York Times

161 Articles and Resources. Go to:  [Next 50]   [End]