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Open Internet Coalition


Self Description

April 2010: "The Internet has been the most successful platform for economic growth, innovation and discovery in our nation’s history. The Open Internet Coalition represents consumers, grassroots organizations, and businesses working in pursuit of a shared goal: keeping the Internet fast, open and accessible to all Americans.

Our coalition speaks for tens of millions of Americans and spans the entire political spectrum. We stand together for protecting an open Internet where everyone can access what they want when they want. In Washington and state capitals across the country we’re working for policies like network neutrality and universal access to high-speed Internet connections that will benefit all of us, not just the large phone and cable companies who sell connections to the Internet.

List of Coalition Supporters

Adaptive Marketing LLC
Aegon Direct Marketing Services
Amazon
American Association of Law Libraries
American Civil Liberties Union
American Library Association
Anglebeds.com
Ask.com
Association of Research Libraries
Bloglines
Chemistry.com
Circumedia LLC
Citysearch
CollegeHumor
Computer & Communications Industry Association
Cornerstone Brands, Inc.
Data Foundry
Domania
Downstream
Dreamsleep.com
Dresses.com
Earthlink
eBay
Educause
Electronic Retailing Association
Entertainment Publications
Evite
Facebook
Free Press
GetSmart
Gifts.com
GoGawGaw
Google
Hawthorne Direct
HomeLoanCenter.com
HSN
IAC
Iceland Health Inc.
iNest
InPulse Response
Internet2
Interval International
iWon
LendingTree
Livemercial
Match.com
Media Access Project
Media Partners Worldwide
Mercury Media
Merrick Group
NationalBlinds.com
Net Coalition
Netflix
New America Foundation
North Texas Technology Council
PayPal
Product Partners
Pronto.com
Public Knowledge
RealEstate.com
ReserveAmerica
Savvier
ServiceMagic
Shoebuy.com
Shopping.com
Skype
Sling Media
Sony Electronics, Inc.
StubHub
Success in the City
TechNet
Ticketmaster
TiVo
Tonystickets.com
Tranquilitymattress.com
Twitter
US PIRG
Vanguard
Washington Bureau for ISP Advocacy
Windward Instruments
YouTube"

http://www.openinternetcoalition.org/index.cfm?objectid=0016502C-F1F6-6035-B1264DD29499E9D0

Third-Party Descriptions

May 2010: '“They don’t want to be a Washington player. They want to be seen as a technology company that explains to Washington what they’re doing,” said Markham C. Erickson, executive director of the Open Internet Coalition, an industry trade group of which Google is a member.'

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/23/technology/23goog.html

April 2010: '"If you are trying to engage as many people as possible, social media is tremendous. . . . I don't know what I would call it. A tactic? I guess so, because it is very valuable tactically to connect with people who are like-minded," said Jonah Seiger, managing partner of Connections Media, which represents clients including Google and Skype as part of a pro-net neutrality group called the Open Internet Coalition.'

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/04/23/AR2010042305249.html

Relationships

RoleNameTypeLast Updated
Organization Head/Leader (past or present) Markham C. Erickson Esq. Person May 23, 2010

Articles and Resources

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
May 21, 2010 Sure, It’s Big. But Is That Bad?

QUOTE: “The government is finally onto the notion that they have to start asking questions about Google,” he said. “Google started off saying they were going to treat everything on the Web neutrally. That is the basis on which they secured dominance. And now they’ve changed the rules.”

New York Times
Apr 24, 2010 Undercover persuasion by tech industry lobbyists

QUOTE: The influence peddlers of K Street have discovered the power of social networking on such Web sites as Twitter and Facebook. Using their own names without mentioning that they work in public relations or as lobbyists, employees of companies with interests in Washington are chattering online to shape opinions in hard-to-detect ways.

Washington Post