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Louis J. Foreman


Self Description

Third-Party Descriptions

February 2012: 'Louis J. Foreman, founder of Edison Nation, which produces the PBS show “Everyday Edisons,” agrees. “With first-to-invent you run the risk of going through the patent process and at any time someone can I say, ‘I thought of that two years ago, here’s my notebook,’ ” said Mr. Foreman, who is also chief executive of Enventys, a product-design company that has more than 500 patents. “It makes it difficult to raise money.”'

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/09/business/smallbusiness/business-owners-adjusting-to-patent-system-overhaul.html

June 2011: '“We focus on the people who have great ideas but want to keep their day job,” says Louis Foreman, the chief executive of Edison Nation, the company in Charlotte, N.C., that teamed up with Ms. Kaufman. “We’ll never compete with the people who are hard-wired to go out and start their own business — and we don’t want to.” But risk-averse people have eureka moments...'

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/12/business/12proto.html

Relationships

RoleNameTypeLast Updated
Organization Head/Leader (past or present) Founder/Co-Founder of Edison Nation Organization Jun 12, 2011

Articles and Resources

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Feb 08, 2012 Business Owners Adjusting to Overhaul of Patent System

QUOTE: The most sweeping patent system changes in more than 50 years became law in September with enactment of the America Invents Act, which the White House has said will help turn inventions into businesses faster. Entrepreneurs and small-business owners who rely on the patent system to protect their intellectual property are just starting to understand the changes, which phase in over an 18-month period that ends in March 2013.

New York Times
Jun 11, 2011 You Bring an Idea, and They’ll Do the Rest

QUOTE: risk-averse people have eureka moments, too, he says. And that’s Edison Nation’s sweet spot....company splits all revenue with its inventors. “There’s no hold-back. If a dollar comes in, 50 cents goes to the inventor, 50 cents to us. It’s a transparent process.”

New York Times