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Prof. Jonathan Zimmerman Ph.D.


Self Description

June 2011: "Jonathan Zimmerman, a professor of education and history at New York University, is the author of “Small Wonder: The Little Red Schoolhouse in History and Memory.”"

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/04/opinion/04zimmerman.html

Third-Party Descriptions

January 2005: "Bible classes in public schools were once common across the nation. The first proponents in the early years of the last century were liberal Protestant reformers who believed Christianity would mitigate the evils of segregation and war, according to Jonathan Zimmerman, author of Whose America? Culture Wars in the Public Schools."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A29266-2005Jan22.html

Relationships

RoleNameTypeLast Updated
Employee/Freelancer/Contractor (past or present) New York University (NYU) Organization Jun 4, 2011

Articles and Resources

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Feb 17, 2012 A Stereotype Worth Celebrating

QUOTE: In our college admissions process, especially, we punish Asian Americans who hew too closely to the stereotype. Rather than rewarding students for their individual effort and achievement, we effectively penalize them for doing so well as a group.

Washington Post
Jun 03, 2011 When Teachers Talk Out of School (Op-Ed)

QUOTE: Such teachers have become minor Internet celebrities, lauded by their fans for exposing students’ insolent manners and desultory work habits. Their backers also say that teachers’ freedom of speech is imperiled when we penalize their out-of-school remarks...The truly scary restrictions on teacher speech lie inside the schoolhouse walls, not beyond them.

New York Times
Jan 23, 2005 A Break in Class for the Bible Faces Challenges

QUOTE: For 65 years, weekday Bible classes have been part of the fabric of growing up in this town of 24,000 in Augusta County and in a score of other small towns and hamlets in rural Virginia. It is such an accepted tradition that 80 to 85 percent of the first-, second- and third-graders in Staunton participate. But now, the practice is being challenged by a group of parents who have asked the School Board to end or modify weekday religious education.

Washington Post