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Prof. Alicia H. Munnell Ph.D.


Self Description

August 2006: "Alicia H. Munnell is the Peter F. Drucker Professor in Management Sciences at Boston College's Carroll School of Management. Previously, Prof. Munnell was a Member of the President's Council of Economic Advisers (1995-1997) and Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Economic Policy (1993-1995). She spent most of her professional career at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, where she became Senior Vice President and Director of Research in 1984. She has published many articles, authored numerous books, and edited several volumes on tax policy, Social Security, public and private pensions, and productivity.

Prof. Munnell was co-founder and first President of the National Academy of Social Insurance and is currently a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, the National Academy of Public Administration, and the Pension Research Council at Wharton. She is a member of the Board of the Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel Corporation, The Century Foundation, the National Bureau of Economic Research, and the Pension Rights Center.

Dr. Munnell earned her B.A. from Wellesley College, an M.A. from Boston University, and her Ph.D. from Harvard University."

http://www2.bc.edu/~munnell/

Third-Party Descriptions

July 2009: "Married people with similar earnings may also consider another strategy. Here, one person claims spousal benefits at full retirement age and switches to his or her own, and presumably higher, benefits later, said Alicia H. Munnell, director of the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College."

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/11/your-money/11retire.html

March 2006: The move to freeze pensions at solid, profitable companies like Verizon—and at others, including IBM, Sprint, Nextel, Tribune Corp., Lexmark, Alcoa and Russell Corp.—is the latest sign of pressure on traditional guaranteed pension plans. 'It's an entirely new phenomenon for healthy companies to freeze their pensions,' says Alicia Munnell, director of the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College.

http://www.aarp.org/bulletin/yourmoney/big_freeze.html

August 2006: 'This should make [employers] more willing to put in the automatic enrollment provisions' for 401(k) plans, says Alicia Munnell, director of the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. 'We need to make these plans as easy and automatic as possible.'

http://www.csmonitor.com/2006/0809/p03s03-uspo.html

October 2005: "Post-bubble, the picture looks different. Various people have studied how investors perform in their 401(k)'s. According to Alicia Munnell, a pension expert at Boston College and previously a White House economist, pension funds over the long haul earn slightly more than the average 401(k) holder."

Relationships

RoleNameTypeLast Updated
Member of (past or present) American Academy of Arts and Sciences (AMACAD) Organization Aug 17, 2006
Employee/Freelancer/Contractor (past or present) Boston College (BC) Organization Nov 1, 2005
Student/Trainee (past or present) Boston University Organization Aug 17, 2006
Organization Head/Leader (past or present) Center for Retirement Research (CRR) Organization Aug 17, 2006
Director/Trustee/Overseer (past or present) Century Foundation, The (TCF) Organization Aug 17, 2006
Employee/Freelancer/Contractor (past or present) Federal Reserve System (FED) Organization Aug 17, 2006
Student/Trainee (past or present) Harvard University Organization Aug 17, 2006
Member of (past or present) Institute of Medicine (IOM) Organization Aug 17, 2006
Member of (past or present) National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) Organization Aug 17, 2006
Organization Head/Leader (past or present) Founder/Co-Founder of National Academy of Social Insurance (NASI) Organization Aug 17, 2006
Director/Trustee/Overseer (past or present) National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) Organization Aug 17, 2006
Member of (past or present) Pension Research Council (PRC) Organization Aug 17, 2006
Director/Trustee/Overseer (past or present) Pension Rights Center Organization Aug 17, 2006
Organization Executive (past or present) Treasury Department/Department of the Treasury Organization Aug 17, 2006
Student/Trainee (past or present) Wellesley College Organization Aug 17, 2006
Employee/Freelancer/Contractor (past or present) White House (Presidential advisory staff) Organization Nov 1, 2005
Member of (past or present) White House Council of Economic Advisers (CEA) Organization Aug 17, 2006

Articles and Resources

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Jul 11, 2009 Collect Now, or Later? Timing Your Social Security Benefits

QUOTE: Collecting Social Security as soon as you are eligible is a tempting proposition — but experts agree you should try to resist if you can.

New York Times
Aug 09, 2006 Pension reform aims to boost savings: President Bush is expected to sign a law that promotes fully funded pensions and automatic 401(k)s.

QUOTE: retirement experts express concern that the Pension Protection Act of 2006 could accelerate the trend of companies freezing or abandoning traditional pensions that have helped provide a secure retirement for millions of workers at large corporations.

Christian Science Monitor
Mar 01, 2006 The Big Freeze: As companies end their traditional pensions, workers are left out in the cold.

QUOTE: ...Verizon announced it was freezing its pension plan. As part of a move expected to save the company $3 billion over 10 years, the telecommunications giant announced that managerial workers would no longer earn pension benefits after June 30 this year. Because of the way such traditional defined benefit pensions are calculated—generally as a percentage of the salary earned during the last several years of service—the freeze will take a big bite out of Bryerton's anticipated pension.

AARP Bulletin
Oct 30, 2005 The End of Pensions

QUOTE: For the U.A.W., Miller noted forlornly, "30 and Out" - 30 years to retirement - became a rallying cry. Eventually, the union got what it wanted, and workers who started on the assembly line after high school found they could retire by their early 50's. "These pensions were created when we all used to work until age 70 and then poop out at 72," Miller told me. "Now if you live past 80, a not-uncommon demographic, you're going to be taking benefits for longer than you are working. That social contract is under severe pressure."

New York Times