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George Pratt Shultz


Self Description

January 2006: "George P. Shultz is the Thomas W. and Susan B. Ford Distinguished Fellow at the Hoover Institution. He was sworn in on July 16, 1982, as the sixtieth U.S. secretary of state and served until January 20, 1989. In January 1989, he rejoined Stanford University as the Jack Steele Parker Professor of International Economics at the Graduate School of Business and a distinguished fellow at the Hoover Institution.

He is a member of the board of directors of Bechtel Group and Fremont Group. He is chairman of the J. P. Morgan Chase International Council and chairman of the Accenture Energy Advisory Board. He is also chairman of the California Governor's Council of Economic Advisors and co-chairman of the Committee on the Present Danger...

His publications include Economic Policy Beyond the Headlines (2d edition), cowritten with Kenneth Dam (University of Chicago Press, 1998), and his best-selling memoir, Turmoil and Triumph: My Years as Secretary of State (Charles Scribner's Sons, 1993). His monograph, Economics in Action: Ideas, Institutions, Policies, was published in 1995 as a part of the Hoover Essays in Public Policy series.

He also authored Economic Policy Beyond the Headlines (1978); Workers and Wages in the Urban Labor Market (1970); Guidelines, Informal Controls, and the Market Place (1966); Management Organization and the Computer (1960); and Labor Problems: Cases and Readings (1953).

From 1981 until his appointment as U.S. secretary of state, Shultz was chairman of President Ronald Reagan's Economic Policy Advisory Board.

He became secretary of the Treasury in May 1972, serving until May 1974. During that period he also served as chairman of the Council on Economic Policy. As chairman of the East-West Trade Policy Committee, Shultz traveled to Moscow in 1973 and negotiated a series of trade protocols with the Soviet Union. He also represented the United States at the Tokyo meeting of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.

In 1974, he left government service to become president and director of Bechtel Group, where he remained until 1982. While at Bechtel, he maintained his close ties with the academic world by joining the faculty of Stanford University on a part-time basis.

Shultz served in the administration of President Richard Nixon as secretary of labor for eighteen months, from 1969 to June 1970, at which time he was appointed director of the Office of Management and Budget.

From 1968 to 1969, he was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford.

In 1957, Shultz was appointed professor of industrial relations at the University of Chicago Graduate School of Business. He was named dean of the Graduate School of Business in 1962.

He taught at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1948 to 1957, taking a year's leave of absence in 1955 to serve as senior staff economist on the President's Council of Economic Advisers during the administration of President Dwight Eisenhower....

Shultz graduated from Princeton University in 1942, receiving a B.A. degree in economics. That year he joined the U.S. Marine Corps and served through 1945. In 1949, Shultz earned a Ph.D. degree in industrial economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology."

http://www.hoover.org/bios/shultz.html

Third-Party Descriptions

June 2011: "Atlanta — In an extraordinary new initiative announced earlier this month, the Global Commission on Drug Policy has made some courageous and profoundly important recommendations in a report on how to bring more effective control over the illicit drug trade. The commission includes the former presidents or prime ministers of five countries, a former secretary general of the United Nations, human rights leaders, and business and government leaders, including Richard Branson, George P. Shultz and Paul A. Volcker."

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/17/opinion/17carter.html

Relationships

RoleNameTypeLast Updated
Advisor/Consultant to (past or present) Accenture Organization Jan 9, 2006
Director/Trustee/Overseer (past or present) Organization Head/Leader (past or present) Bechtel Group Organization Jan 9, 2006
Advisor/Consultant to (past or present) California (State Government) Organization Jan 9, 2006
Employee/Freelancer/Contractor (past or present) Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (CASBS) Organization Jan 9, 2006
Organization Head/Leader (past or present) Department of Labor/Labor Department (DOL) Organization Jan 9, 2006
Director/Trustee/Overseer (past or present) Fremont Group Organization Jan 9, 2006
Organization Executive (past or present) Hoover Institution Organization Jan 9, 2006
Advisor/Consultant to (past or present) JPMorgan Chase & Co. Organization Jan 9, 2006
Student/Trainee (past or present) Employee/Freelancer/Contractor (past or present) MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Organization Jan 9, 2006
Organization Head/Leader (past or present) Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Organization Jan 9, 2006
Student/Trainee (past or present) Princeton University Organization Jan 9, 2006
Employee/Freelancer/Contractor (past or present) Stanford University Organization Jan 9, 2006
Organization Head/Leader (past or present) State Department/Department of State (DOS) Organization Jan 9, 2006
Organization Head/Leader (past or present) Treasury Department/Department of the Treasury Organization Jan 9, 2006
Member of (past or present) U.S. Marine Corps ("Marines") Organization Jan 9, 2006
Employee/Freelancer/Contractor (past or present) University of Chicago Organization Jan 9, 2006
Supervisor of (past or present) Robert Kagan Ph.D.,MPP Person Apr 1, 2008
Supervisor of (past or present) Prof. Paul D. Wolfowitz Person Jan 9, 2006

Articles and Resources

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Jun 16, 2011 Call Off the Global Drug War (OP-ED)

QUOTE: [US] Drug policies here are more punitive and counterproductive than in other democracies, and have brought about an explosion in prison populations. At the end of 1980, just before I left office, 500,000 people were incarcerated in America; at the end of 2009 the number was nearly 2.3 million. There are 743 people in prison for every 100,000 Americans, a higher portion than in any other country and seven times as great as in Europe.

New York Times
Jun 27, 2008 Ban torture for security's sake, coalition tells Bush

QUOTE: A bipartisan coalition of elder statesmen, military and national security honchos, and religious leaders is calling on the president to return to pre-9/11 standards for the treatment of prisoners. An executive order to ban torture is essential, they say, to improve national security, shore up alliances in the war on terror, and recommit to American values.

Christian Science Monitor