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National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA)


Self Description

February 2006: "The National Academy of Public Administration is an independent, non-partisan organization chartered by Congress to assist federal, state, and local governments in improving their effectiveness, efficiency, and accountability. For more than 35 years, the Academy has met the challenge of cultivating excellence in the management and administration of government agencies.

Federal agencies, Congress, state and local governments, academia, and foundations frequently seek the Academy's assistance in addressing both short-term and long-term challenges-including budgeting and finance, alternative agency structures, performance measurement, human resources management, information technology, devolution of federal programs, strategic planning, and managing for results.

The Academy's most distinctive feature is its membership of 550 Fellows. They include current and former Cabinet officers, members of Congress, Governors, Mayors, state legislators, diplomats, business executives, local public managers, foundation executives, and scholars. They form the heart of the Academy's studies-from inception through implementation-serving on project panels and guiding other major activities."

http://www.napawash.org/about_academy/index.html

Third-Party Descriptions

Relationships

RoleNameTypeLast Updated
Member (past or present) Prof. Alicia H. Munnell Ph.D. Person Aug 17, 2006
Member (past or present) Sean O'Keefe Person Feb 9, 2006
Director/Trustee/Overseer (past or present) Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld Person Feb 24, 2006

Articles and Resources

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Jan 30, 2008 Study Finds Government Ethics Lapses

QUOTE: The Enron scandal of 2001 set off a tidal wave of concern about corruption and unethical behavior across corporate America, but a new survey shows that government agencies are not free of such behavior.

Washington Post