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Prof. Matt Blaze


Self Description

Third-Party Descriptions

July 2012: 'Matt Blaze, a professor of computer and information science at the University of Pennsylvania, has written extensively about these issues and believes we are confronted with two choices: “Don’t have a cellphone or just accept that you’re living in the Panopticon.”'

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/15/sunday-review/thats-not-my-phone-its-my-tracker.html

March 2010: "The existence of a marketed product indicates the vulnerability is likely being exploited by more than just information-hungry governments, according to leading encryption expert Matt Blaze, a computer science professor at University of Pennsylvania."

http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2010/03/packet-forensics/

February 2008: '“The software world tends not to think about these issues,” said Matt Blaze, an associate professor of computer and information science at the University of Pennsylvania. “We tend to make assumptions about the hardware. When we find out that those assumptions are wrong, we’re in trouble.”'

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/22/technology/22chip.html

August 2007: "Matt Blaze, a security researcher at the University of Pennsylvania who helped assess the FBI's now-retired Carnivore internet-wiretapping application in 2000, was surprised to see that DCSNet seems equipped to handle such modern communications tools. The FBI has been complaining for years that it couldn't tap these services."

http://www.wired.com/politics/security/news/2007/08/wiretap

Relationships

RoleNameTypeLast Updated
Advisor/Consultant to (past or present) Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Organization Aug 31, 2007
Employee/Freelancer/Contractor (past or present) University of Pennsylvania, The ("Penn") Organization Aug 31, 2007

Articles and Resources

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Dec 27, 2013 How Worried Should We Be About the Alleged RSA-NSA Scheming?

QUOTE: If the NSA sabotaged a secure random number generator in a widely used commercial library, it used an extremely blunt instrument....There’s far more at stake here than NSA’s reputation or RSA’s and other U.S. business interests, however. We urgently need NSA and RSA to come clean with the public so we can begin to unravel the damage that’s been done to the basic mechanisms of trust in our online world.

Wired
Jul 13, 2012 That’s No Phone. That’s My Tracker.

QUOTE: Thanks to the explosion of GPS technology and smartphone apps, these devices are also taking note of what we buy, where and when we buy it, how much money we have in the bank, whom we text and e-mail, what Web sites we visit, how and where we travel, what time we go to sleep and wake up — and more. Much of that data is shared with companies that use it to offer us services they think we want.

New York Times
Mar 24, 2010 Law Enforcement Appliance Subverts SSL

QUOTE: Normally when a user visits a secure website, such as Bank of America, Gmail, PayPal or eBay, the browser examines the website’s certificate to verify its authenticity. At a recent wiretapping convention however, security researcher Chris Soghoian discovered that a small company was marketing internet spying boxes to the feds designed to intercept those communications, without breaking the encryption, by using forged security certificates, instead of the real ones that websites use to verify secure connections.

Wired
Feb 22, 2008 A Method for Critical Data Theft

QUOTE: a simple method to steal encrypted information stored on computer hard disks. The technique, which could undermine security software protecting critical data on computers, is as easy as chilling a computer memory chip with a blast of frigid air from a can of dust remover.

New York Times
Aug 29, 2007 Point, Click ... Eavesdrop: How the FBI Wiretap Net Operates

QUOTE: Privacy groups and security experts have protested CALEA design mandates from the start, but that didn't stop federal regulators from recently expanding the law's reach to force broadband internet service providers and some voice-over-internet companies, such as Vonage, to similarly retrofit their networks for government surveillance.

Wired