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National Critical Infrastructure Protection Center (NIPC)


Self Description

April 2014: "The National Protection and Programs Directorate, Office of Infrastructure Protection (IP) leads and coordinates national programs and policies on critical infrastructure issues and has established strong partnerships across government and the private sector. The office conducts and facilitates vulnerability and consequence assessments to help critical infrastructure owners and operators and State, local, tribal, and territorial partners understand and address risks. IP provides information on emerging threats and hazards so that appropriate actions can be taken. The office also offers tools and training to partners to help them manage the risks to their assets, systems, and networks."

http://www.dhs.gov/office-infrastructure-protection

December 2002: "On February 26, 1998, the Department of Justice and the FBI created the National Infrastructure Protection Center (NIPC) at FBI Headquarters in Washington, D.C."  http://www.nipc.gov/about/about3.htm "... brings together representatives from U.S. government agencies, state and local governments, and the private sector in a partnership to protect our nation's critical infrastructures." http://www.nipc.gov/about/about.htm

Third-Party Descriptions

Relationships

RoleNameTypeLast Updated
Owned by (partial or full, past or present) Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Organization Apr 12, 2014
Owned by (partial or full, past or present) Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Organization May 7, 2004
Employee/Freelancer/Contractor (past or present) Howard Schmidt Person
Organization Head/Leader (past or present) Founded/Co-Founded by Michael Vatis Person

Articles and Resources

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Dec 20, 2002 Bush Administration to Propose System for Monitoring Internet

QUOTE: The Bush administration is planning to propose requiring Internet service providers to help build a centralized system to enable broad monitoring of the Internet and, potentially, surveillance of its users.

New York Times