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Roadway Package Systems (RPS)


Self Description

Third-Party Descriptions

December 2008: "...Originally conceived as a lower cost competitor to UPS, Roadway Package System (RPS), was created to take advantage of new bar code, material handling and computer technologies. After beginning service on March 11, 1985, the company grew, expanding service from its initial coverage of the Mid-Atlantic states, so much so that it eventually became the largest subsidiary of its parent company, Akron-based Roadway Services. By 1996, RPS had achieved 100% coverage of the United States and Canada. In addition, Roadway Services had been reformed as a new holding company called Caliber System, Inc.

In 1997, Fred Smith, founder of FedEx, contacted Dan Sullivan, co-founder of RPS and now president of Caliber Systems, Inc. about merging the two companies. In 2000, FedEx, merged the Caliber System, Inc. operating companies into the FedEx organization with Robert's Express becoming FedEx Custom Critical and RPS becoming FedEx Ground. Viking Freight which initially operated under its original name was re-branded FedEx Freight in 2001..."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FedEx_Ground

April 2008: "After she recovered, Jean started looking for work. She spotted a help-wanted ad from Roadway Package Systems, which said it was looking for independent contractors to deliver packages."

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/20/business/20work.html

Relationships

RoleNameTypeLast Updated
Status/Name Change to FedEx Corp (Federal Express) Organization Dec 16, 2008

Articles and Resources

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Apr 20, 2008 Working Life (High and Low)

QUOTE: She soon discovered that her new employer had embraced a controversial strategy to squeeze down costs by millions of dollars each year: it insisted that Jean and the other drivers were independent contractors, not employees. The I.R.S., New York and many other states are investigating this strategy, convinced that many companies use it to cheat their workers and cheat on taxes.

New York Times